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Pharmacokinetics of carprofen in anaesthetized pigs: a preliminary study

Published:October 19, 2020DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaa.2020.09.006

      Abstract

      Objective

      To investigate the pharmacokinetics of carprofen after a single intravenous (IV) dose and multiple oral doses administered to pigs undergoing electroporation of the pancreas.

      Study design

      Prospective experimental study.

      Animals

      A group of eight female pigs weighing 31.74 ± 2.24 kg (mean ± standard deviation).

      Methods

      Carprofen 4 mg kg−1 was administered IV after placement of a central venous catheter during general anaesthesia with isoflurane. Blood samples were collected 30 seconds before and 5, 10, 20, 30 and 60 minutes and 2, 4, 6, 8, 12 and 24 hours after carprofen administration. Subsequently, the same dose of carprofen was administered orally, daily, for 6 consecutive days and blood collected at 36, 48, 60, 72, 96, 120, 144 and 168 hours after initial carprofen administration. Plasma was analysed using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. Standard pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by compartmental analysis of plasma concentration–time curves. Data are presented as mean ± standard error.

      Results

      The initial plasma concentration of IV carprofen was estimated at 54.57 ± 3.92 μg mL−1 and decreased to 8.26 ± 1.07 μg mL−1 24 hours later. The plasma elimination curve showed a bi-exponential decline: a rapid distribution phase with a distribution half-life of 0.21 ± 0.03 hours and a slower elimination phase with an elimination half-life of 17.31 ± 3.78 hours. The calculated pharmacokinetic parameters were as follows: the area under the plasma concentration–time curve was 357.3 ± 16.73 μg mL−1 hour, volume of distribution was 0.28 ± 0.07 L kg−1 and plasma clearance rate was 0.19 ± 0.009 mL minute−1 kg−1. The plasma concentration of carprofen, administered orally from days 2 to 7, varied from 9.03 ± 1.87 to 11.49 ± 2.15 μg mL−1.

      Conclusions and clinical relevance

      Carprofen can be regarded as a long-acting non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug in pigs.

      Keywords

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