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Comparison of the brainstem auditory evoked responses during sevoflurane or alfaxalone anaesthesia in adult cats

  • Carlos Ros
    Correspondence
    Correspondence: Carlos Ros, DVM, Neurology/Neurosurgery Service, Small Animal Teaching Hospital of the Catholic University of Valencia “San Vicente Mártir”, Valencia, 46018 Spain.
    Affiliations
    Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Catholic University of Valencia “San Vicente Mártir”, Spain
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  • Carme Soler
    Affiliations
    Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Catholic University of Valencia “San Vicente Mártir”, Spain
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  • Alejandra García de Carellán Mateo
    Affiliations
    Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Catholic University of Valencia “San Vicente Mártir”, Spain
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Published:March 03, 2017DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaa.2016.11.007

      Abstract

      Objective

      To compare the effects of general anaesthesia using sevoflurane or alfaxalone on the brainstem auditory evoked response (BAER) test in adult healthy cats.

      Study design

      Prospective, clinical, ‘blinded’, crossover study.

      Animals

      Ten feral adult healthy cats.

      Methods

      Premedication consisted of dexmedetomidine (0.01 mg kg–1) intramuscularly (IM). The first general anaesthesia was induced and maintained with sevoflurane (treatment S) for physical examination, BAER test, complete blood tests, thoracic radiographs and abdominal ultrasound. The second general anaesthesia was induced with alfaxalone (treatment A) IM (2 mg kg–1) and maintained with alfaxalone (10 mg kg–1 hour–1) for the BAER test, followed by neutering surgery.
      The BAER recordings were compared for differences in latencies, amplitudes and waveform morphology. Data were analysed using Student's t test and Wilcoxon rank test for paired samples for parametric and non-parametric data, respectively. Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05.

      Results

      General anaesthesia was uneventful; normal BAER comprising five peaks could be identified in both treatments. Mean ± SD latencies were 1.05 ± 0.09, 1.83 ± 0.11, 2.52 ± 0.19, 3.43 ± 0.17 and 4.39 ± 0.15 ms and 1.03 ± 0.04, 1.81 ± 0.73, 2.53 ± 0.15, 3.37 ± 0.13 and 4.33 ± 0.13 ms in treatments S and A, respectively. Median (interquartile range) amplitudes were 2.83 (0.67), 1.27 (0.41), 0.30 (0.40), 1.05 (0.82), 0.61 (0.38) microvolts and 2.84 (1.21), 1.49 (1.18), 0.26 (0.32), 0.91 (0.50) and 0.92 (0.64) microvolts in treatments S and A, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in mean latencies or median amplitudes between both the anaesthetics.

      Conclusions and clinical relevance

      This study demonstrates that there were no statistically significant differences between both the anaesthetics on the BAER test in adult healthy cats. Moreover, two possible anaesthetic protocols are described for cats undergoing this electrodiagnostic test.

      Keywords

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